GDP|GUHDO Tool Holders can be Run Bi-Directional

Static nut (left) and Ball Bearing collet nut (right)

Static nut (left) and Ball Bearing collet nut (right)

Need to run a tool counter-clockwise and think you need a left-hand tool holder? Not necessarily! In case you didn’t know, ball-bearing collet nuts on HSK/ISO toolholders make the need for a left-hand tool holder obsolete! And if you are not sure if you are using collet nuts with a ball bearing, the attached photo shows the difference. The one on the right is a two-piece construction which houses the ball bearing. The one on the left is a simple static nut that cannot be run in a counter clockwise rotation and for which you need a complete new tool holder since the threads on the tool holder would not allow you to just change out the nut.

Another advantage of ball bearing collet nuts on your tool holders is the elimination of tool slippage problems. All GUHDO tool holders are all Made in Germany with the ball bearing collet nut included.

To buy HSK63F tool holders now, click here

GDP|GUHDO Tooling for Flip-Flops?

This is one of our customers running a test to cut something a little unusual… GUHDO tooling is great for cutting everything from composites to foam as we can see from the video.

 

 

Proper Use of Drill Bits on CNC Machining Centers

DSC_0019Using solid carbide drill bits in a standard collet on a CNC router often leads to vibrations causing a poor finish and tool breakage which can get expensive if you are drilling hard wood or composite materials (as a note – PCD diamond tipped drill bits are recommended for composites). When compared to spiral router bits, drill bits are run at a slower RPM generally and while breakage might be tolerated if you only drilling the occasional hole, it can become a problem with production runs of greater volume.  The reasons for this problem are two-fold:

DSC_0009

1)      Your using a 10mm shank bit (w/flat on shank):   Most metric drill bits have a 10mm shank with a flat area machined onto the shank (for set screw tightening).  When inserted into a 10mm collet this flat spot prevents the collet from concentrically gripping the shank all around. (see image).

Guhdo toolholder drill bit shank HSK collet

HSK 63 F Toolholder with collet and drill bit with flat spot. The collet does not grip the shank all around.

The solution: a small drill adapter (6381) that goes between the collet and the drill bit fills this space and allows the collet to concentrically grip the shank.  This adapter has a 10mm cylindrical shank (no flat) to go, which accepts the 10mm shank w/flat drill bit, tightened with a set screw as is standard on boring machines.

HSK 63 F Toolholder with standard collet and small drill bit adapter Guhdo

HSK 63 F Toolholder with standard collet and small drill bit adapter

2)      Using cylindrical shank bits (no flat on shank): Many in-between or uncommon sizes of cylindrical shank drill bits don’t fit snugly into the closest collet size available and therefore slip or chatter during the drilling process.

6380

The solution:  a Universal drill adapter (6380) which comes in two diameter ranges, infinitely adjustable within the specified range.  (accepts 1-13mm diameter drills, or 3-16mm diameter) and is available in HSK63 F, ISO/SK30 and SK40 version.  The 6380 Universal Drill Adapter has high-clamping power and accuracy, is Made in Germany, and can be run either clockwise or counter-clockwise.

For more information check out The Drill on Drill Bits or visit our website at guhdo.com!

Aggregate Heads

Are you struggling with moving your work from one machine to another?  Do you have to re-position the work-piece on your machine?  Is your machine unable to perform specific criteria, which causes you to turn down business?  If you have answered “yes” to any of these questions, continue reading this post!

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 11.08.47 AM

Generally, companies consider purchasing an aggregate head for a CNC machine when an additional axis would reduce material handling and speed up production or when existing equipment does not have the capability needed to efficiently perform a job at hand. Since there are many styles and types of aggregates, choosing the right one is essential.

There are three primary considerations:
1) How long will you be “in the cut?” (Excessive heat resulting from the cutting action can cause aggregate failure.)
2) How are you cutting the material? (Will you be primarily routing or sawing?)
3) What type of material are you cutting? (Is it a dense material or a soft material?)

Aggregate head bodies are constructed of aluminum, which keeps the weight to a minimum on your machine spindle and in your carousel.  This also allows the heat to dissipate, keeping the aggregate as cool as possible while it’s in the cut.  Internally, our aggregates use beveled, calibrated gears to ensure there is minimal “backlash” in the gearing.  As you can imagine, there is a lot of energy transferred to the gearing when the aggregate first enters the cut.  That energy is transformed to heat.  Based on this scenario, how you keep the aggregate cooled is critical to the longevity of the aggregate.

Viscous grease is the most common method of cooling/lubricating the gearing.  A greased gear-lubricated aggregate is ideal for routing and light scoring of material.  But, with viscous grease lubrication, there is a “catch”.  During operation, the temperature of the aggregate cannot exceed 185 degrees Fahrenheit.  That is the maximum heat index the grease can withstand. If the aggregate temperature exceeds 185 degrees, the grease will burn off, creating a metal-on-metal situation with the gearing, greatly increasing the temperature internally.

source: Woodworking Network Interview with GUHDO Aggregate Sales Specialist Chris Kelly

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 11.12.33 AM

Screen Shot 2013-06-03 at 11.10.31 AM

For more information visit our website at http://www.guhdo.com/aggregates.php