Cutters

The rating of cutters not only depends on superficial quality characteristics but also on the suitable design for the cutter which is very decisive for the respective application. Tools that are economically priced at first sight, can be rather expensive in the application, as they often don’t provide the expected machining quality or they are too detailed or inaccurate in handling.

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  1. Round shape tooling reduces the free running noise.  
  2. Balance-borings are visible quality characteristics
  3. Sharp edges produce a finish-surface without grinding
  4. With the correct coating, the performance time can be at least doubled
  5. The thickness of the cutting edge considerably specifies the number of re-grindings.

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Always pay attention to form, shape and edge of the cutting tool. Through the use of round shape tools, one can reduce the noise level. Selecting the proper cutting material, and/or coating material will almost always lead to an economically improved tool.

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For more information visit guhdo.com

A Tool as an Asset

DSC_0218The main difference between a quality saw and a less than perfect saw lies not in the outward appearance but rather in what’s below the surface. And with the ever increasing amount of different saw blades, the choices are aplenty and become more challenging.

Top Quality tools offer a high degree of technical sophistication. There are some important details that differentiate the better tools from those of lesser quality.

The quality of the materials, the technology, the workmanship and the support provided by the tool manufacturer are the factors which eventually determine whether the user will be able to perform high quality cuts with a saw blade and also how long the blade will last.

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Sales figures for low-cost producers show that purchase decisions are often price-driven. Other factors, such as product quality and safety, are often merely an afterthought or only come in as a secondary consideration.

Those who make purchasing decisions based on price alone though, generally wind up paying more in the end. When one considers that the money spent on tools is only a small percentage of the total tool cost but the tool has a decisive influence on the quality of the workpiece, a high quality tool should be the right choice.

For more information visit guhdo.com

Source: VDMA Quality Guide – Perceived Value of Tools

Getting Deep on Diamond Tooling

Diamond is known as a material with impressive characteristics. Even the name, Diamond, which stems from the ancient Greek word  “αδάμας” – “adámas,” translates to unbreakable. In particular diamond is the hardest mineral known and also has the highest thermal conductivity. These two traits, in addition to its abrasion-resistance,  make Diamond quite a popular material in the industrial tooling area. To illustrate the level to which diamond tools surpass carbide tools in regard to hardness, one only has to compare each materials value on the Knoop hardness scale. While synthetic diamond generally rates between 5000 to 7000, the average hardness for a carbide tool only has a value of about 1700 to 2400.

Hardness Scale

Hardness Scale

Polycrystalline Diamond tools are an established, well accepted solution for high volume production and they are now cost effective as well. They have long proven to be an investment in quality AND productivity as they can provide substantial savings in tooling costs.

Diamond Router Bit

Diamond Router Bit

Based on case histories, polycrystalline diamond tools can outlast a carbide tool by a ratio of roughly 300:1. However, this takes into account a wide range of materials machined.   So, while one machinist may achieve a ratio of 50-fold life span for a diamond tool cutting very abrasive material, another may outrun his previously used carbide tool by 800 times on a solid wood application.

A sampling of styles available to machine a wide range of materials such as MDF, particle board, solid surface material, phenolic etc.

A sampling of styles available to machine a wide range of materials such as MDF, particle board, solid surface material, phenolic etc.

Today, diamond tools have earned their position in most every woodworking, composite, plastic and solid surface cutting application.  From routing and edge-banding, profiling, sawing, jointing and grooving to slotting and hogging; diamond tools are used in almost all cutting tool applications.

Today’s modern manufacturing facilities  are running expensive CNC machining centers with constant demand for higher output and lower unit costs being paramount.  Most CNC machinists have recognized the value of diamond cutting tools. Elimination of downtime alone can result in a significant reduction in tooling costs, not even taking reduced sharpening costs, stocking needs and lost production into consideration.

Although diamond tools may not be the solution to every tooling issue, they should not be excluded from consideration without a thorough analysis of the potential advantages. With today’s ever-increasing demand for higher efficiency and lower costs, the toughest material may just solve the toughest tooling problems!

HSK 63 F Tool Holders for CNC Machines

HSK 63 F Tool Holders for CNC Machines

Staying Sharp on Saw Blades

Carbide Tipped Saw Blade

Carbide Tipped Saw Blade

To ensure saw blades meet optimal cut expectancy and last as long as possible, a few key factors are essential.

First and foremost it’s important that the saw blade selection is based on the material that will be cut. Choosing the proper blade for the material will not only optimize the saw blade’s longevity, but also increase its performance. Many shops with cutting needs for varying materials use an “all-around” blade to perform cuts on a number of different materials. Although this approach may seem most cost efficient, it decreases the tool’s life and in most cases fails to deliver cutting results and a high quality cut.

Just as important to optimizing blade performance is having a high quality, sturdy, and solid-built saw to begin with. Saving money on a lower quality saw may appear to be beneficial in the short run, but saving money on cheaper blades  and saws will trickle down to increased costs for sharpening, more frequent needs for blade replacement and lower cut quality in the long run along with a higher cost per linear foot cut.

Scoring Blade

Scoring Blade

The tooth shape is essential when it comes to guaranteeing the optimal blade life. Any tooth shape may work for a period of time and deliver satisfying results in the beginning but, again, in the long run an improper tooth shape will deliver poor cutting results and increase your overall cost of tooling. For example, an Alternate top bevel may deliver great results for cutting wood across the grain, but using it on particle board will lead the edges to become dull rather quickly leading to a shorter time duration between sharpening and replacement. This happens  because the alternate top bevel teeth break down more rapidly when confronted with resins and silica particles in particle board.

GUHDO Classic Blade

GUHDO Classic Blade

In order to make sure the arbor and saw collars are free of debris, they should be cleaned properly as resin and wood dust can damage  the collars and lead to unintended results which may include less accurate cuts and quicker dulling of the blade. Cleaning blades can be done quite effectively with Simple Green, which is non-caustic and not damaging to the blade or your lungs. Scraping the blade or its teeth is not advisable. Blades can also be soaked for a while. For example taking the blade off the machine during lunch time and soaking it in a solution and then brushing it off will assure that no dust particles or other residue is on the blade during thee cutting process.  Soaking can also be done overnight in kerosene and then the blade should be brushed off with a soft brush, like a tooth brush. When employing this solution remember that the solvents are extremely flammable, so take appropriate precautions. Machining operators will notice that this will increase the blades life significantly and in most cases lead to the blade lasting about three to four times as long. Blade maintenance is particularly important if the material has pits or content in it as some wood species do; or if there is glue in the material.

Furthermore it is important that the saw is properly aligned as saws out of alignment can be dangerous and generate heat that can lead to wear on the saw blade.

A quality carbide tipped saw blade should be able do be sharpened at least 12 times. To reach that number, overrunning the saw blade past it’s ideal sharpening time needs to be avoided. For more information on sharpening tools and how to find out when they should ideally be sharpened take a look at this post. 

We offer a full service sharpening center for both diamond(PCD) and solid carbide saw blades. For more information visit our website at GUHDO.com!